A Baldur’s Gate Trilogy

“Baldur’s Gate is a city divided by walls…walls that cut the Gate into three distinct cities: The rich live atop the bluffs protected from the bourgeoisie clinging to the slopes by barriers that literally prevent the middle class from rising above their stations, and beyond the protection of the city’s walls its many outcasts live with no law but the daggers of thieves.” – from Murder in Baldur’s Gate.

 For your gaming pleasure – three scenarios that make up an epic story-arc revolving around the famed city of Baldur’s Gate. If you have ever wanted to run a swords & sorcery themed Fate game, now’s your chance. You’ll find the scenarios at the bottom of the Dungeon Master’s Guide. There’s more than an occasional nod to French literary classics like A Tale of Two Cities or even The Three Musketeers; not to mention Fritz Leiber’s Lankhmar stories – with their colourful characters and cut-throat thieves’ guilds.

You’ll find they’re compatible with all of your 5th edition books like the Player’s Handbook or the Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide if you play D&D. In fact, you’ll find that the 5th ed. write-ups for spells and monsters are easy to emulate using the guide-lines on this blog or those found in the Freeport Companion.

Uluvathae! (fortune bring you joy – in elvish).

The Orcus Pit — Dyson’s Dodecahedron

The dead stir. Investigations at the graveyard and nearby give no reason, but the dead refuse to remain where they belong. Guards have been posted, brave souls have spent the night watching for the foul necromancer that is bringing them back… but to no avail. If anything, the constant paranoia about the graveyard and the […]

via The Orcus Pit — Dyson’s Dodecahedron

The Monk

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Let’s try to recreate the monk class from the Dungeons & Dragons game by developing some appropriate stunts. As you might expect many of these stunts build on the Acrobat profession. Other attributes of the monk might be expanded with character aspects, high-lighting the use of ki (or inner energy), mastery of the elements and of course devotion to martial arts. You may also wish to add a magical stunt – see the drop-down menu under the Dungeon Master’s Guide.

For more on the monks of Faerûn see the following pages:

http://forgottenrealms.wikia.com/wiki/Monk

http://forgottenrealms.wikia.com/wiki/Special:Search?search=monasteries&fulltext=Search

Sample stunts are as follows:

Crouching Tiger – Once per exchange, you may ignore initiative ranking and choose to initiate an attack whenever a creature declares that it will attempt to physically harm you, though you may only respond to that particular threat.

N.B. You must declare use of this stunt prior to any dice being rolled.

Deflect Missiles (Acrobat) – At the cost of a fate point you may choose to defend any or all non-magical missile attacks in your current zone as one defend action, enjoying a +2 bonus. You must declare your intention before any dice are rolled and your subsequent action provides passive opposition for the remainder of the exchange.

Flurry of Blows (Warrior) – Your fists count as a medium weapon and deal 1 bonus shift of bludgeoning damage on a successful attack.

Hidden Dragon (Warrior) – When you successfully make an unarmed attack with Warrior, you may reduce the stress dealt by 1 to gain a boost even if you did not succeed with style. However, that boost only rewards you with a re-roll not a +2 (requires Flurry of Blows).

Martial Artist (Acrobat) – Provided you are wielding a finesse weapon you may make attack actions using the Acrobat profession (requires Peaceful Warrior).

Peaceful Warrior (Acrobat) – Provided you are not wearing any armour or shield you enjoy two free boosts per session which may be invoked on any Defend action.

Step Of The Wind (Acrobat) – You gain a +2 whenever you attempt to vault objects or leap to any higher level available.

Walking On Water (Acrobat) – You move unimpeded across one zone featuring water provided you are not also attempting anything more complex than a free action.

Detect Magic

Provided a PC has access to the School of Divination aspect then it makes sense that they might create an advantage using their spell-casting profession to uncover magical aspects in a scene. Those aspects may describe the lingering effects of spells, the presence of prohibitive magic in the form of wards or even the state of the weave itself when wild magics run unchecked.

In situations as described above a create an advantage action will be called for with passive opposition providing the difficulty. If the aspect being uncovered is particularly unique, then the Dungeon Master might be applying the Bronze Rule and treating the magic as being akin to a character, with multiple aspects and stunts. This makes a lot of sense in the case of high-level wards – prohibitive magics programmed to respond in specific ways to trespassers. In Faerûn every mage worth knowing employs a sigil as a kind of occult signature. If used for warding purposes that sigil may be reinforced by a number of charged glyphs, each one working in concert to contribute to a powerful ward.

Of course if the Player Character has access to the Detect Magic spell as described in the Freeport Companion then there may be no need to go to the dice but even if a magical aspect is revealed it’s effect may continue to influence and affect the scene: just like any other game or situation aspect. How to remove that aspect will be decided between players and Dungeon Master.

For some inspired ideas describing magical wards and traps see this page over at the Alexandrian blog: http://thealexandrian.net/wordpress/12909/roleplaying-games/thought-of-the-day-disarming-magical-traps

Another Look At Racial Aspects

This is a revised and improved approach to creating characters for play in the Forgotten Realms. The information given in the racial aspects section of the Dungeon Master’s Guide is there to serve as inspiration for aspects. It should inform any player as to the possibilities they can draw on when developing their character’s aspects. Race and ethnicity is important enough in the realms to warrant special mention among your character aspects. As I’ve stated in the guide “Suffice to say that anyone not human or even halfling should probably mention it… it will likely get mentioned by others anyway.”

The core rules of Fate are clear on the need for aspects to be well defined and crucially, understood by everyone at the table. Simply taking the aspect Sun Elf  or Shield Dwarf  is too broad and open to all kinds of abuse by the player. Counting Elf  among your aspects should not give the player carte blanche to invoke on a wide range of actions from swordplay to magic or agility as is the implication in the Freeport Companion. This interpretation is closer to the kinds of class abilities found in Dungeons & Dragons. One of the dangers of opening play up to this kind of aspect or interpretation there of is that it devalues the other aspects that make each scene unique. This is true in any game of Fate, not just the swords & sorcery genre. Why bother working to take advantage of your environment or your opponent’s weaknesses if you can just fall back on that Elf  aspect to improve all manner of attack actions, including magic. If however your aspect is defined as Sun Elf Bladesinger , that tells us something, not alone that your character is a sun elf but also that they have been trained in a specialised form of swordplay that prioritises defensive posture and tactical positioning. The exact martial and magical skills of your character can be further expanded on with stunts. Indeed many of the stunts listed in the Freeport Companion could be easily reworded or even reinterpreted as aspects.

A racial aspect in Fate of the Forgotten Realms could say something about a cultural background, a training in a specific field, a real-world profession or even a problem that the character is saddled with – a Trouble aspect, e.g. “No Love for Half-Orcs” . Given that aspects are expected to be double-edged, simply attaching a racial qualification or ethnic description to an aspect is enough to suggest potential compels, e.g. “Illuskan Skald”  or “Gnome’s Nose for Potions” . Unless you’re playing a very typical heartlander, at least one of your aspects should inform us of your ethnicity.